Expats should do homework before choosing a school

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Expats should do homework before choosing a school

For a family planning an international move, finding the right school is a major task. Many factors are taken into consideration in the decision, such as whether you should you look for an international school, whether schools are available in your native language and educational system, and if attending a local school is a possibility.

Since Korean is the medium of instruction in local schools and no special provisions are made for non-Korean speakers, expatriate families in Korea usually send their children to international or foreign schools. The following is a partial list of schools in Seoul.



Seoul Foreign School:

55 Yeonhui-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-330-3100)

Accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges of the United States. Offers an American system of education for junior kindergarten through grade 12. Advanced Placement courses available. Students have opportunity to pursue International Baccalaureate diploma during junior and senior years or enroll in individual IB courses. A Christian school, but admission is open to all students.



Seoul International School:

32-16 Bokjeong-dong, Sujeong-gu, Seongnam-si, Gyeonggi province (tel. 82-2-2233-4551)

Approximately 1,000 students in junior kindergarten through grade 12. Accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Advance Placement classes in 15 subjects. ESL programs available for grades 1-6.



British School of Seoul Foreign School:

55 Yeonhui-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-332-9648)

Offers the British National Curriculum and Independent Schools Examination Board syllabi. Age 3 through grade 5. Has 16 full-time teachers. English as a Foreign Language Support Program on site. Teacher available for children with mild learning difficulties.



Seoul German School:

4-13 Hannam-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-792-0797)

Approved by German Education Ministry. Offers classes starting at age 18 month to grade 10. To be eligible, students must demonstrate proficiency in German.



Seoul French School:

98-3 Banpo-dong, Seocho-gu, Seoul (Phone:82-2- 535-1158)

Offers classes for age 3 through grade 10. Limited classes available for grades 11, 12. Proficiency in French required.

Japanese School in Seoul:

153 Gaepo-dong, Gangnam-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-572-7011)

Kindergarten through middle school available. School uses Japanese education system.



Hanseong Chinese Primary School:

15 Chungmuro 1-ga, Jung-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-776-1688)

Approximately 640 students. School follows Taiwanese education system, using textbooks from Taiwan. Thirty teachers are ethnic Chinese or Taiwanese nationals.



Hanseong Chinese Middle and High School:

17 Yeonhui-dong, Seodaemun-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-334-7217)

Almost 670 students in middle school and high school. Follows Taiwanese education system.

Seoul American Elementary School:

U.S. Military Post, Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-7916-4378)

Seoul Elementary School is on the Yongsan army base. The school admits children of U.S. military personnel.



Seoul American Middle School:

U.S. Military Post, Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-7916-7364)



Seoul American High School:

U.S. Military Post, Itaewon-dong, Yongsan-gu, Seoul (Phone: 82-2-7918-8822)

Accredited by the U.S. North Central Association of Colleges and Schools. Public school run by U.S. Department of Defense.





"At Home Abroad... in Korea" is a monthly feature. We invite readers to share their experiences or suggest topics for publication. Please respond to estyle@joongang.co.kr.


by Kim Hoo-ran

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