Films from Italy show the bizarre and the mundane

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Films from Italy show the bizarre and the mundane

Looking for some inspiring drama to spring you from your rain-soaked depression? If Hollywood blockbusters have worn you down, some flicks from the sunny Mediterranean might brighten your mood.
To celebrate Italy’s National Holiday, which was June 2, the Korea branch of the Italian Institute for Foreign Trade and the Italian Embassy are co-hosting an Italian Film Festival, six movies ranging from psychodrama to slices of daily life.
“The six movies represent the modern version of neo-realistic Italian movies that borrow their theme from small everyday encounters and uncover the values hidden under the surface,” said the Italian trade commissioner, Giuseppe Pezzulo, at yesterday’s premiere. “The films serve as an effective medium to carry the culture, history and philosophy of the Italian people.”
The psychodrama “Empty Eyes,” which has already been presented at the World Film Festival 2001 in Montreal and at Italy’s Turin Film Festival, among other venues, delves into the darkest impulses of the human psyche. After a son murders his elderly father, he hides out at an Italian seaside hotel. There, he meets a young adolescent girl who falls in love with him, which marks his first crisis. Meanwhile, the criminal realizes the true reasons for his heinous act. As the film digs into the core of family crises, it provides the audience plenty to mull over. Realistic settings are another highlight.
“Scarlet Diva,” directed by “Triple X” heroine Asia Argento, draws attention to the director’s autobiographical elements. Other films include thought-provoking human dramas that deal with themes such as love, hate and life itself, employing elements of neo-realism that so typify post-World War II Italian cinema.
All screenings take place at DongSoong Art Center in north Seoul. Use subway line No. 4 to Hyehwa Station. Films contain Korean subtitles. For more information, contact (02) 779-0811.


by Park Eun-sil

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