Flat screen to forefront

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Flat screen to forefront

It takes two to tango. When the duo is Sony and Wega, the results can be spectacular.
Sony Wega televisions are at the forefront of the flat-screen technological revolution. Sony acquired Wega, a German electronics manufacturer, decades ago. The fruits of that venture is the Sony Wega line, a redesign of the cathode ray tube-based television.
The latest offering is the Sony Wega KE-42MR1K, a 42-inch wide-screen plasma television available in Japan and Korea. The display panel has a 1,024 by 78 pixel resolution for high-quality images.
To demonstrate the aesthetics of this state-of-the-art technology, the recent product launch featured displays of videos by Korean artists at the Gana Art Center in Seoul.
The new flat screen televisions minimize reflection from outside sources, such as lights in living rooms or the sun streaming through windows. But that’s just the beginning.
The interior of the television is where things get interesting ― and complicated. The Wega engine analyzes three TV scanning lines for high resolution and pure colors. Wega (pronounced vay-guh) televisions are designed to enhance details, provide better on-screen focus and fewer flecks of video “noise.”
The Wega units also feature SRS 3D Audio Enhancement. The system simulates surround sound using just two speakers.
The unit also has self-adjusting volume to eliminate booming commercial breaks. The visuals can also be turned off to listen to the music on a DVD.
The media receiver unit is compatible with Sony memory sticks, which allows users to view photos taken with Sony Cybershot or Handycam cameras.
Wega systems also have V-chip technology, permitting parents to lock out channels they deem inappropriate.
If those technological advances aren’t exactly what you’re looking for, you can tweak some of the Wega Sony televisions. Sony user groups like groups.yahoo.com/group/sony-wega/ can provide technical information.
The 42-inch Sony Wega television is just shy of 14 million won ($11,650), including the television stand.


by Joe Yong-hee

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