Classic ballet finishes run this weekend

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Classic ballet finishes run this weekend

“Sleeping Beauty” has reawakened in Seoul.
While LG Arts Center hosts Matthew Bourne’s interpretation of the Nutcracker Ballet, another beloved Tchaikovsky, based on the fairy tale about a princess awakened from a century-long sleep by the kiss of a prince, has been getting a more traditional treatment from the Korea National Ballet at the Seoul Arts Center.
“Sleeping Beauty” opened last weekend; its final performances are tonight and tommorrow. The opera, which premiered in St. Petersburg in 1890, was first choreographed by France’s Marius Petipa. Known as the “father of classical ballet,” Petipa is remembered as one of the 19th century’s great choreographers, and because it features all of the classical ballet techniques developed by Petipa, “Sleeping Beauty” is often called the “textbook of ballet.”
Tschaikovsky wrote three ballets, “Sleeping Beauty,” “The Nutcracker Ballet” and “Swan Lake.”
This weekend’s “Sleeping Beauty” performances, which will feature more than 100 dancers, draw on the choreography of Rudolf Nureyev, the legendary Russian dancer who defected in 1961 and is widely regarded as the greatest male dancer of the century.
Patricia Ruanne, who worked with Nureyev for an extended time, is staging his version with the Korea National Ballet. Tonight’s show will feature the Houston Ballet’s Pollyana Ribeiroas as the princess and Simon Ball as the prince. Tomorrow’s performance stars Lee Won-kook and Kim Joo-won, both from the Korea National Ballet, in the lead roles.
The Korean Symphony Orchestra will perform under the direction of Pavel Klinichev.
Shows start at 7:30 p.m. at the opera theater of Seoul Arts Center in the Seocho district, southern Seoul. Ticket prices range from 20,000 won ($17) to 100,000 won.


by Limb Jae-un

For more information, call (02) 580-1300 or log onto www.sac.or.kr.

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