Computers have a more stylish future

Home > Culture > Arts & Design

print dictionary print

Computers have a more stylish future

Just because it is functional doesn’t mean it has to be ugly.
Take personal computers, for example. Computers have evolved from huge contraptions a basement wide to box-shaped metal containers. These days, some computers are being used as part of a home entertainment system, and since they have to be placed in the living room, makers are designing them to look more like part of the decor. Certain monitor manufacturers are targeting young consumers by designing their products in the shape of elephants or apples.
With more emphasis being placed on design, Intel Korea and Samsung Electronics recently hosted a nationwide design competition for personal computers. The challenge was to design the PC of the future. The winners were announced on Monday.
The grand prize went to the Egg ― a computer that consists of three small marbles that are placed on a large tray-shaped platform.
The future prize went to Turning Lamp, a computer that can be turned on like a lamp. “B-Membrain” beams images to a wall and has a unique mouse that can be activated with just one finger.
Several other famous designers also presented their own visions of the future.
For instance, fashion designer Lie Sang-bong, who is noted for using hangul characters on his clothes, created a stylish bag that is also a laptop, while Kim Won-cheol, an architectural designer, designed a computer built into a dressing table. Other artists who contributed include Web designer Seol Eun-ah and automobile designer Richard Chung.
The products submitted to the competition and other designer-created PCs will be on display at the Korea IT Show, part of the Samsung Electronics’ exhibition booth. The show will take place at COEX in southern Seoul. It begins tomorrow and runs until Sunday.


By Wohn Dong-hee Staff Writer [wohn@joongang.co.kr]

More in Arts & Design

Museums and theaters set to reopen on Tuesday

Kim Young-taek, 'the master of Korean pen art,' dies age 76

Chang Ucchin retrospective

Rare exhibition sheds light on foreign researchers of Korean art

Book on Korean art master of traditional painting to be released in U.S. this year

Log in to Twitter or Facebook account to connect
with the Korea JoongAng Daily
help-image Social comment?
lock icon

To write comments, please log in to one of the accounts.

Standards Board Policy (0/250자)

What’s Popular Now