Regulate violent porn

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Regulate violent porn

When there is a shocking event related to sex or violence, the mass media is often vehemently attacked.
Some say the media’s overexposure of sex and violence instigated the crime. Critics point out that the media has had a bad influence on children and young viewers who do not yet have the ability to judge what they see. Programs that openly search for criminals are criticized for educating people on ways to commit crime.
Media scholars, however, believe there is an indirect, rather than direct, relationship between crime and the media.
A viewer exposed to sex and violence in the media does not immediately commit a crime, but overexposure is one of the elements that may lead him or her to commit a crime. They cite as evidence the fact that countries with the highest exposure to sex and violence in the media do not necessarily have the highest crime rate.
The scholars note that emphasizing the responsibility of the media blurs the various social, cultural and economic circumstances that may have led to the crime.
On the other hand, there are some people who believe that sex and violence in the media satisfies by proxy violent and sexual desires. Following that line of thinking, public opinion on the domestic media’s expression of sex and violence has become more tolerant in the last few years. Regulations have also been greatly relaxed.
An environment that views those critical of sex and violence in the media as narrow-minded moralists has developed, thanks to more open discourse.
However, the recent sexual violence committed against elementary school students in Daegu makes us reflect on whether our society has become too relaxed, to the point of irresponsibility about sex and violence in the media.
The news was shocking. Sexual misdemeanors were committed on school grounds. Younger male and female students were the target.
Those who committed the acts said they imitated pornographic videos they saw on cable TV and the Internet.
Zoologist Desmond Morris classified sexual acts into 10 categories and introduced the concept of “status sex” in his book, “The Human Zoo.” It is having sex not to satisfy one’s sexual or reproductive desires, but to confirm one’s superiority. Many of the sexual acts portrayed in pornographic videos are also status sex. We must immediately regulate violent pornographic videos that have dominated our cable and satellite television.

The writer is a deputy culture and sports editor of the JoongAng Ilbo.

By Yang Sung-hee [shyang@joongang.co.kr]
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