Get your groove on and dance the night away

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Get your groove on and dance the night away

테스트

The Hongdae crowd rocks to the beat of their favorite D.J. By Oh Sang-min


If you like nightlife, there is only one place you need to go in Seoul - Hongdae.

The area near Hongik University known to most simply as Hongdae has been developing its identity as a place for artistic expression since the 1980s. These days, the area is also known for its eclectic restaurants, intimate cafes, dazzling nightlife and the rowdy underground beneath it all.

At night after the clock strikes nine, hordes of young Koreans and foreigners crowd the streets of Hongdae with enough energy and enthusiasm to turn even the quietest of people into a bit of a wild child.

And on the last Friday of every month, long lines of people in micro minis, killer heels, tank tops and baggy jeans queue up in lines that can be 30 meters (98.4 feet) deep to dance at Club Day, which allows clubbers new and old to test over 20 clubs in one night for the cost of a single night at the disco.

테스트

Club Day is now in its eighth year. It marked its 100th event last Friday with special events and performances by over 100 artists representing Hongdae’s creative spirit.

But the event that has since become a regular fixture in the ephemera of Hongdae’s vibrant and exciting nighttime scene started small, with just 1,000 people and four clubs.

The first Club Day was launched in March 2001 by Club 108, Club M1, Joker Red and Myungwolgwan to promote their clubs and give more people the chance to enjoy them.

The response was huge. In subsequent months, a number of new clubs clamored for inclusion. The idea was that for one price, people could get access to multiple clubs, allowing them to sample the scene - and hopefully bringing them back for more.

For club enthusiasts it is the perfect way to let off steam. For first-time clubbers it is a great way to multi-task and find their best entertainment options.

“Many people find it difficult to have a good time when they first go clubbing because there are just too many clubs and they do not know where to go,” Club SAAB manager Son Jae Woo said. “We can definitely say that Club Day has made it easier for first-timers to go clubbing.”

“As a newcomer to Hongdae, I didn’t know which club to go to or where to start,” said Gang Hae-won, a student from Yonsei University. “With Club Day, I finally have an excuse to come and check everything out.”

The popularity of the event has brought about a number of changes in how it is run, and there are now limits on which clubs can take part.

“Not every club can participate in Club Day,” said Son. “The Club Culture Association sets some restrictions.”

One of the association’s rules prohibits club owners from registering more than one club under the same name for Club Day to restrict club owners from reaping excessive profits from the event.

The association, which was established in December 2003, is composed of civic groups, city officials, artists and others in the industry. It is charged with overseeing Club Day and other festivals in the area.

Nestled near the university that has become known for fostering young artists, the event draws members of the university crowd looking for a little extra-curricular expression, but is also popular with foreigners.

“Back home, everything closes before midnight. That means we have to buy everything inside the club, which is very costly. But in Korea, restaurants, convenience stores and even coffee shops stay open till 4 in the morning, so that’s great .?.?. To top everything, the music, people and atmosphere are excellent!” said Chris Moores from California.

However, it’s not all fun and games on Club Day. Sometimes the sheer size of the crowd leaves little room for dancing in some of the smaller venues. Drunken revelers are also a problem, and fights are not uncommon.

“The streets are dirty, with drunk people lying on the ground in a pool of vomit, and the stuffy, smoky clubs don’t leave any room to even breathe.” said Kwon Jung-joo, a graduate of Sogang University. “I only go to the clubs on weekdays because then you have enough room and plus you can easily initiate a conversation with the D.J.s or the owners.”

This has in a sense taken the shine off of Club Day’s feel-good image. The day was initiated to promote culture and youth, but for some it has turned into a way to hook up for the night rather than get hooked on the rhythms of the night.

Still, the Club Day crowds are expanding, as is the number of clubs in the area. It seems there is a new club or bar opening in the neighborhood every week, meaning that no matter if you are a first time visitor or a dance hall junkie, you can keep right on swinging the night away. The 101st Club Day is on Sept. 25. estyle@joongang.co.krestyle@joongang.co.kr

The 20,000 won admission price includes a free drink. Go to www.theclubday.co.kr for more information and a list of participating clubs. Here are just a few:



CLUB M2

Equipped with a heavy-duty sound system and tripped-out lights, M2 dazzles with swirling electronic music from an impressive list of domestic and international D.J.s. Its monthly events help to ensure that its loyal list of returnees gets the ultimate club experience.

Hours are 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. Admission is 10,000 won ($8) on weekdays, on weekends it’s 15,000 won before 10 p.m. and 20,000 won after 10 p.m. Call (02) 3143-7573 or visit www.clubm2.com.



CLUB Q-VO

This stylish hip-hop club nestled just above M2 is decorated with Formula 1 paraphernalia. It organizes monthly events with top Korean and international hip-hop artists.

Hours are 8 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. Tuesdays to Sundays and 8 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Admission is 10,000 won before 10 p.m. and 15,000 won after 10 p.m. Call (02) 3143-7573 or visit www.clubqvo.com.



CLUB NB

Noise Basement is the long form of this club’s short name and the loud hip-hop music pumping from the huge speakers prove the club has earned it. This is often the first choice of die-hard club addicts and is also popular with foreigners.

Hours are 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Admission is 10,000 won on weekdays and 15,000 won on weekends. Call (02) 326-1716 or visit http://clubnb.cafe24.com.



CLUB SAAB

This club is well known for its D.J. booth, which is installed at the club’s entrance to allow visitors to select anything from hip-hop to techno. Fashion-conscious college students and young professionals make up most of the crowd.

Hours are 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weekends, and 6 p.m. to 4 a.m. on weekdays. Admission is free on weekdays and 10,000 won on weekends. Call 011-9115-6929 or visit http://saabb2.cyworld.com.

If you like nightlife, there is only one place you need to go in Seoul - Hongdae.

The area near Hongik University known to most simply as Hongdae has been developing its identity as a place for artistic expression since the 1980s. These days, the area is also known for its eclectic restaurants, intimate cafes, dazzling nightlife and the rowdy underground beneath it all.

At night after the clock strikes nine, hordes of young Koreans and foreigners crowd the streets of Hongdae with enough energy and enthusiasm to turn even the quietest of people into a bit of a wild child.

And on the last Friday of every month, long lines of people in micro minis, killer heels, tank tops and baggy jeans queue up in lines that can be 30 meters (98.4 feet) deep to dance at Club Day, which allows clubbers new and old to test over 20 clubs in one night for the cost of a single night at the disco.

Club Day is now in its eighth year. It marked its 100th event last Friday with special events and performances by over 100 artists representing Hongdae’s creative spirit.

But the event that has since become a regular fixture in the ephemera of Hongdae’s vibrant and exciting nighttime scene started small, with just 1,000 people and four clubs.

The first Club Day was launched in March 2001 by Club 108, Club M1, Joker Red and Myungwolgwan to promote their clubs and give more people the chance to enjoy them.

The response was huge. In subsequent months, a number of new clubs clamored for inclusion. The idea was that for one price, people could get access to multiple clubs, allowing them to sample the scene - and hopefully bringing them back for more.

For club enthusiasts it is the perfect way to let off steam. For first-time clubbers it is a great way to multi-task and find their best entertainment options.

“Many people find it difficult to have a good time when they first go clubbing because there are just too many clubs and they do not know where to go,” Club SAAB manager Son Jae Woo said. “We can definitely say that Club Day has made it easier for first-timers to go clubbing.”

“As a newcomer to Hongdae, I didn’t know which club to go to or where to start,” said Gang Hae-won, a student from Yonsei University. “With Club Day, I finally have an excuse to come and check everything out.”

The popularity of the event has brought about a number of changes in how it is run, and there are now limits on which clubs can take part.

“Not every club can participate in Club Day,” said Son. “The Club Culture Association sets some restrictions.”

One of the association’s rules prohibits club owners from registering more than one club under the same name for Club Day to restrict club owners from reaping excessive profits from the event.

The association, which was established in December 2003, is composed of civic groups, city officials, artists and others in the industry. It is charged with overseeing Club Day and other festivals in the area.

Nestled near the university that has become known for fostering young artists, the event draws members of the university crowd looking for a little extra-curricular expression, but is also popular with foreigners.

“Back home, everything closes before midnight. That means we have to buy everything inside the club, which is very costly. But in Korea, restaurants, convenience stores and even coffee shops stay open till 4 in the morning, so that’s great .?.?. To top everything, the music, people and atmosphere are excellent!” said Chris Moores from California.

However, it’s not all fun and games on Club Day. Sometimes the sheer size of the crowd leaves little room for dancing in some of the smaller venues. Drunken revelers are also a problem, and fights are not uncommon.

“The streets are dirty, with drunk people lying on the ground in a pool of vomit, and the stuffy, smoky clubs don’t leave any room to even breathe.” said Kwon Jung-joo, a graduate of Sogang University. “I only go to the clubs on weekdays because then you have enough room and plus you can easily initiate a conversation with the D.J.s or the owners.”

This has in a sense taken the shine off of Club Day’s feel-good image. The day was initiated to promote culture and youth, but for some it has turned into a way to hook up for the night rather than get hooked on the rhythms of the night.

Still, the Club Day crowds are expanding, as is the number of clubs in the area. It seems there is a new club or bar opening in the neighborhood every week, meaning that no matter if you are a first time visitor or a dance hall junkie, you can keep right on swinging the night away. The 101st Club Day is on Sept. 25. estyle@joongang.co.krestyle@joongang.co.kr

The 20,000 won admission price includes a free drink. Go to www.theclubday.co.kr for more information and a list of participating clubs. Here are just a few:



CLUB M2

Equipped with a heavy-duty sound system and tripped-out lights, M2 dazzles with swirling electronic music from an impressive list of domestic and international D.J.s. Its monthly events help to ensure that its loyal list of returnees gets the ultimate club experience.

Hours are 9 p.m. to 6 a.m. Admission is 10,000 won ($8) on weekdays, on weekends it’s 15,000 won before 10 p.m. and 20,000 won after 10 p.m. Call (02) 3143-7573 or visit www.clubm2.com.



CLUB Q-VO

This stylish hip-hop club nestled just above M2 is decorated with Formula 1 paraphernalia. It organizes monthly events with top Korean and international hip-hop artists.

Hours are 8 p.m. to 5:30 a.m. Tuesdays to Sundays and 8 p.m. to 6:30 p.m. on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Admission is 10,000 won before 10 p.m. and 15,000 won after 10 p.m. Call (02) 3143-7573 or visit www.clubqvo.com.



CLUB NB

Noise Basement is the long form of this club’s short name and the loud hip-hop music pumping from the huge speakers prove the club has earned it. This is often the first choice of die-hard club addicts and is also popular with foreigners.

Hours are 8 p.m. to 6 a.m. Admission is 10,000 won on weekdays and 15,000 won on weekends. Call (02) 326-1716 or visit http://clubnb.cafe24.com.



CLUB SAAB

This club is well known for its D.J. booth, which is installed at the club’s entrance to allow visitors to select anything from hip-hop to techno. Fashion-conscious college students and young professionals make up most of the crowd.

Hours are 6 p.m. to 6 a.m. on weekends, and 6 p.m. to 4 a.m. on weekdays. Admission is free on weekdays and 10,000 won on weekends. Call 011-9115-6929 or visit http://saabb2.cyworld.com.


By Yim Seung-hye, Hyon Mi-kyung Contributing writers
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