Grace in retirement

Home > >

print dictionary print

Grace in retirement

In the summer of 1953, a married couple hopped in a Chrysler New Yorker and hit the road from their home in Missouri for a trip to the East Coast. The couple stopped at a roadside diner and shared a fruit salad for lunch with glasses of iced tea. They checked into a motel that charged $5 per night and ordered 70-cent fried chicken for dinner.

Neither the diner owner nor the motel staff recognized that their guests had occupied the White House just six months earlier. For their first summer break out of the White House, Harry Truman and his wife Bess drove across America in a three-week road trip unaccompanied by bodyguards or attendants. They crashed at friends’ houses, playing piano, and spent a jolly night with locals when a cook at a diner threw an impromptu party after recognizing them. In Pennsylvania, Truman got pulled over for a ticket. He was driving too slowly on the highway.

After retiring from office in January 1953, Truman lived off his Army pension of $112 a month. He turned down high-paying jobs from corporations saying he did not want to commercialize the office of the presidency. He refused anything that would undermine the dignity of his former office. In 1958, he sold off his family’s farm to live less meagerly. That year, the Congress passed the Former Presidents Act to provide benefits to former presidents. Until then, the U.S. had no pension or other retirement benefits for former presidents.

Last week on Capitol Hill in Washington, President Lee Myung-bak made an excellent speech. He stopped in front of congressmen who served in the Korean War and saluted them. It was a touching gesture paying respect to American soldiers who risked their lives to defend a foreign land and people way off in the Far East. Congress returned the warmth in extended applause for Lee.

When he returned home, Lee received a much frostier reception. Here, whistle-blowers were accusing him of real estate speculation, property price rigging and inheritance tax evasion over a large plot of land in a posh area of southern Seoul that he bought in his son’s name to build a post-retirement residence.

It is a pity that the same man who won such respect from a U.S. president and Congress is so distrusted by his own people. His extravagant retirement plan contradicted his public declaration that he would donate all his personal wealth to Korean society. We envy Americans for their humble presidents like Truman, given the poor track record of our ex-presidents, whose retirements have been tainted with corruption scandals. Is it too much to ask for at least one president whom we can respect after he leaves the Blue House?

-ellipsis-



1953년 6월 어느 날 미국에서 평범한 중산층이 타는 크라이슬러 자동차 한대가 지붕에 여행가방 꾸러미를 싣고 미주리주 인디펜던트市 를 떠나 동부로 향했다. 노부부는 길가 레스토랑에서 과일 한접시로 점심을 하고 아이스 티로 목을 축이고, 5달러 짜리 모텔에 들었다. 저녁은 70센트 짜리 닭 튀김을 시켰다.

식당 주인은 물론 주유소 종업원들도 그들이 6개월 전에 퇴임한 트루만 대통령 부부라는 것을 알아보지 못했다. 퇴임후 첫 여름, 전직 대통령부부는 직접 차를 몰며 뉴욕으로 가는 여행길에 오른 것이다. 가는 도중 친구 집에 들러 피아노를 치며 즐거운 밤을 보내기도 했고, 어느 날은 그들을 알아본 식당 요리사가 동네 사람을 불러와 소란스런 밤을 겪기도 했다. 펜실바니아 턴 파이크 고속도로에서는 규정 속도보다 늦게 간다고 교통 순경한테 딱지를 받기도 했다.

당시는 퇴임 후 경호도 없었고 전직에 대한 예우도 없었다. 그가 받은 것은 고작 월 112달러의 육군 연금 뿐이었다. 물론 그때도 여러 개인회사들이 그에게 고문직을 요청했다. 그러나 그는 대통령직을 상업적으로 이용하지 않겠다는 결심으로 이를 모두 거절했다. 그것이 대통령의 명예를 지키는 길이라고 생각했다. 1958년 그는 생계를 위해 가족 농장까지 팔았다. 그 해 말에야 미 의회는 전직 대통령 예우법을 만들었다.

지난 주 이명박대통령은 미의회에서 훌륭한 연설을 했다. 그가 6.25에 참전했던 미하원의원들 좌석을 찾아가 거수경례를 하던 모습은 감동적이었다. 미국 병사들의 목숨을 건 희생의 댓가로 오늘의 대한민국이 있게 됐다는 자랑스런 신고요, 감사의 표시였다. 미국 의회는 우리 대통령에게 큰 박수를 아낌없이 쳐주었다.

그런 대통령이 자랑스러우면서도 나의 마음은 착잡했다. 퇴임 후 지낼 내곡동 사저 의혹이 방미기간 중에 터져나왔기 때문이다. 경호처 땅과 개인 땅을 뒤섞어 구입했다는 의혹, 그린벨트 지역만 골랐다는 뒷얘기, 논현동 사저 공시가격 축소 의혹등에 휩싸였다.

대통령이 밖에서는 갈채를 받으면서 왜 개인 재산 문제에서는 이런 식으로 처신을 했을까? 더우기 그는 이미 재산을 사회에 기부하기까지 했는데...안타까운 일이었다. 지난 날, 퇴임 후를 위해 몇천억씩을 챙겼던 우리 대통령들이 떠오르며 동시에 트루만 대통령이 생각난 것이다. 우리에게는 왜 이런 대통령이 없을까?

-중략-
Log in to Twitter or Facebook account to connect
with the Korea JoongAng Daily
help-image Social comment?
lock icon

To write comments, please log in to one of the accounts.

Standards Board Policy (0/250자)

What’s Popular Now