Asiana says pilots erred in San Francisco crash

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Asiana says pilots erred in San Francisco crash

Asiana Airlines acknowledged in documents released Monday that its pilots failed to correct their fatally slow approach to a landing at San Francisco International Airport but also blamed the maker of the jet, saying it did not automatically maintain a safe speed.

U.S. accident investigators made public a filing in which the Korea-based airline asserted that the Boeing 777 had major design flaws that led the pilots to believe it would keep flying at the proper speed and that failed to warn the cockpit crew in time when it did not.

Boeing countered in its own filing with the U.S. National Transportation Safety Board that the airplane performed as expected, and the pilots were to blame for the July 6 crash because they stuck with a troubled landing.

The plane slammed into a seawall at the beginning of a runway during its final approach. The impact ripped off the back of the plane and scattered pieces of the jet as it spun and skidded to a stop.

In all, 304 of the 307 people on board survived. Coroner’s officials concluded that one of three teens who died, Ye Meng Yuan, was run over and killed by a rescue vehicle as she lay on the tarmac.

Asiana acknowledged in its NTSB filing that the crew failed to monitor air speed in the moments before the crash and should have aborted the landing for another go around.

“The probable cause of this accident was the flight crew’s failure to monitor and maintain a minimum safe airspeed during a final approach,’’ Asiana conceded.

However, Asiana argued that the pilots and co-pilot reasonably believed the automatic throttle would keep the plane going fast enough to reach the runway, when in fact the throttle was effectively shut off after the pilot idled it earlier in the landing.

The airline said the plane should have been designed so the auto throttle would maintain the proper speed after the pilot put it in “hold mode.’’

Instead, the auto throttle did not indicate that the plane had stopped maintaining the set air speed, and an alert sounded too late for the pilots to avoid the crash, Asiana said. The airline added that aviation officials have warned Boeing about the issue, but it has not been changed.

Asiana wrote that the pilot flying the plane, Lee Kang-kuk, had been trained to recognize the throttle issue with a 777. The most recent training was three months before the accident, and the instructor specifically used a landing at San Francisco airport as an example.

“This lesson was explained on two occasions by two different instructor pilots,’’ Asiana wrote. Lee “attended the lectures, asked questions specifically about this feature of the automation, and discussed the ‘anomaly’ with his fellow trainee captains after class.’’

The NTSB previously said the pilots showed signs of confusion about the 777’s elaborate computer systems. The agency has not determined an exact cause of the crash. Asiana wrote to the NTSB that under its company policy, “any pilot can and should call for a go-around _ without penalty _ whenever confronted with a potential safety issue.’’

Boeing told the NTSB the airplane and all its systems were functioning as expected.

AP


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