2014.8.7 MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

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2014.8.7 MUSEUMS & GALLERIES

ITALY IN SONGEUN:

WE HAVE NEVER BEEN MODERN


SongEun Art Space, Gangnam District

To Aug. 23: “Italy” is a group show of work by promising Italian young artists, designed by guest curators Angelo Gioe and Maria Rosa Sossai. The title implies skepticism about Western-oriented modernity as well as the belief in a linear progress of history. The exhibition, featuring 22 Italian artists born between the mid-1960s and mid-1980s, shows aesthetic changes that are being embraced by new Italian creatives.

Admission is free. The exhibition’s opening hours run from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Monday to Saturday. The art space is closed on Sundays. Travel to Cheongdam Station, line No. 7, exit No. 9, and walk for 10 minutes. (02) 3448-0100, www.songeunartspace.org

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BEYOND IMPRESSIONISM:

MASTERPIECES FROM THE

MUSEE D’ORSAY


National Museum of Korea, Yongsan District

To Aug. 31: Impressionist and Post-Impressionist works are the focus of this exhibition, which shows the transformation of the Western social environment, thoughts and aesthetics of the late 19th century, as well as the impact they had on modern art.

More than 175 paintings, drawings and other works of craft are on loan from the Musee d’Orsay in Paris, including paintings by Claude Monet and Henri Rousseau. Tickets for adults are 12,000 won ($11.59).The exhibit opens from 9 a.m. to 6 p.m. on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays; to 9 p.m. on Wednesdays and Saturdays; and to 7 p.m. on Sundays and national holidays.

The museum is closed on Mondays.

Go to Ichon Station, line No. 4, exit No. 2

(02) 2077-9000, www.museum.go.kr



EXHIBITION: CHOI CHI-WON

Calligraphy Art Museum of Seoul Arts Center, Seocho District

To Sept. 14: This exhibition of works by contemporary artists is inspired by Silla era (57 B.C.-A.D. 935) scholar Choi Chi-won (857-?).

The artists come from various backgrounds: Performers, sculptors, painters and calligraphers all join together to create something all-encompassing, just like Choi tried to embrace different ideologies to reform politics.

Tickets are 5,000 won for adults and 3,000 won for teenagers and children. The museum is open from 11 a.m. until 8 p.m. Tuesdays to Sundays.

Go to Nambu Bus Terminal Station, line No. 3, exit No. 5 and walk for five minutes.

(02) 580-1300, www.sac.or.kr



KOREAN BEAUTY:

TWO KINDS OF NATURE


MMCA Seoul, Jongno District

To Sept. 28: This exhibition, based on the collection of the National Museum of Modern and Contemporary Art (MMCA), is about Korean artists’ correspondence with and interpretations of nature.

The exhibition is divided into three parts - Gallery 1, Gallery 2 and the space linking both. Gallery 1 focuses on the works in which Korean modern artists, mainly abstract painters and sculptors, try to visualize the essence and spirituality of nature.

The area that connects Gallery 1 and 2 could be the highlight of this exhibition, as it makes excellent use of the space, which features an extraordinarily high wall.

Black-and-white photography is featured in this in-between area, most of which represents reality but it retains abstract qualities and a spiritual ambience at the same time.

Viewers are then led to Gallery 2, where they can see contemporary artists’ paintings of colorful urban landscapes.

Admission is 4,000 won.

The cost also covers all the other exhibitions at MMCA Seoul.

The museum is a 10-minute walk from Anguk Station, line No. 3, exit No. 1.

(02) 3701-9500, www.mmca.go.kr

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EDVARD MUNCH AND THE MODERN SOUL

Hangaram Art Museum of Seoul Arts Center, Seocho District

To Oct. 12: “Edvard Munch and the Modern Soul” is the first retrospective of Norwegian artist Edvard Munch (1863-1944) in Korea.

The exhibition of the expressionist and general modern art pioneer includes the lithograph version of Munch’s iconic “The Scream” and 98 other pieces by the artist, including paintings like “The Kiss,” “The Dance of Life” and “Starry Night.”

The exhibits are on loan from the Munch Museum in Oslo, Norway.

Admission is 15,000 won for adults.

Hours are from 11 a.m. to 8 p.m. The museum is closed on Aug. 25 and Sept. 29.

Go to Nambu Bus Terminal Station, line No. 3, exit No. 5. Walk for five minutes.

(02) 1666-3329, www.munchseoul.com

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SPECTRUM-SPECTRUM

Plateau Gallery, Jung District

To Oct. 12: In this group show, seven established artists will showcase new work that deviates from their signature styles.

The exhibits include a new painting by Dongi Lee, “Power Sale,” which doesn’t feature Atomaus, a famous character he created by combining Atom (Astro Boy), the robot hero of the Japanese anime, and Walt Disney’s Mickey Mouse. The exhibits also include painter Suejin Chung’s first-ever video work “Infinite Human Pattern Actuator” and a filmed performance by sculptor Hyungkoo Lee.

The show features not only these seven established artists’ works but also seven younger artists they recommended.

Tickets cost 3,000 won for adults. Opening hours are 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. Tuesday to Sunday.

Go to City Hall Station, line No. 2, exit 8.

(02) 1577-7595, www.plateau.or.kr

WHITE PORCELAIN JAR II - STROKES ON PURE WHITE

Horim Art Center, Gangnam District

To Oct.18: Pots estimated to have been used as vases or storage in the Joseon era (1392-1910) are now on display at this museum for its second exhibition on white porcelain goods this year.

While the first show focused solely on showing pure white jars, the newest exhibit features those decorated with blue ink. The exhibits include National Treasure No. 222, the Blue and White Porcelain Lidded Jar With a Plum and Bamboo Design.

Admission costs 8,000 won. The center’s opening hours are 10:30 a.m. to 6 p.m. The museum is closed Mondays.

Take bus Nos. 145 or 4212 and get off at the Horim Art Center stop. (02) 541-3525, www.horimartcenter.org


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