It’s time to start splitting the check

Home > >

print dictionary print

It’s time to start splitting the check

When I opened the menu at a fancy Italian restaurant during a blind date, my heart sank when I realized how expensive it was. I chose the place, but it was not intentional. At the same time, a look of contempt and embarrassment appeared and quickly disappeared on my date’s face - as if I had done something wrong.

I chose the least expensive dish and thought, “I will pay for my order.” When the bill arrived, I said, “Let’s split the check,” only to find the same look on his face again. He must have been thinking, “Does she think I can’t afford this dinner?”

I may not be the only one who has gone through such an experience. Blind dates have been a common way to meet a partner for decades in Korea, but the lack of social consensus on who pays for the date often puts us in an awkward situation. Many ask on forums, “If I have a blind date, can we go Dutch?”

It always follows with various opinions. Some say going Dutch is cool while others think asking to split the check sends a message that the date is not going well. There are people who compromise and let the men pay for the dinner, while the women get the drinks. As in most relationships, especially in dating, things are not always logical. Many men say, “I will pick up the check to meet pretty women, but I don’t want to waste my money meeting unattractive ones.”

In fact, women have the same problem. Who actually goes on a blind date for the dinner anyway? It is far more comfortable to pay for what you eat. But women are reluctant to hurt the pride of men, especially when they think the date has potential. Women often don’t want to be seen as “too independent.” While social consensus reminds us that men and women are equal, women may submit to the convention that it is better to let the guy lead. So the woman may end up paying for coffee and dessert, which often costs as much as dinner, and recovers the divided ego.

Recently, a man in his 30s was sentenced to prison for cursing at and assaulting a woman he met on a blind date because she didn’t pay for anything after he had spent 400,000 won, or $370. The story is bitter. More women need to initiate going Dutch on blind dates in order not to fall victim to a crime while letting the man lead the relationship. According to the National Institute of the Korean Language, it is better to say “split the check” rather than “going Dutch.” Whether the blind date goes well or not, let’s split the check and pay for what you eat.

*The author is a culture and sports news writer of the JoongAng Ilbo.

JoongAng Ilbo, Feb. 4, Page 35

by LEE YOUNG-HEE


진짜 일부러 그런 건 아니다. 소개팅 상대가 "어디 갈까요"라고 물었을 때, 하필 그 곳을 떠올린 게 죄라면 죄다. 맛집이라고 소문난 이탈리안 레스토랑에 들어가 메뉴를 펼쳤는데 이런, 가격이 어마어마했다. 순간 보고야 말았다. 상대방의 얼굴에 순식간에 떠올랐다 사라진 낭패와 경멸의 표정. 잘못이라도 저지른 사람처럼 제일 싼 메뉴를 주문하며 속으로 생각했다. '내가 내면 되잖아?' 그러나 계산대 앞에서 "같이 낼께요"라고 입을 떼는 순간, 또 확인하고야 만다. 뭐야, 이 여자. 나 무시하는거야? 하는 표정.
이런 경험, 나만 한 건 아닐거다. 한국을 대표하는 만남 문화인 소개팅이 도입된 지 어언 수십년인데, 아직도 소개팅 비용 문제만큼은 사회적 합의가 안 돼 있어 우리를 곤경에 빠뜨린다. 포털사이트 게시판에는 '소개팅 나가는데 더치 페이(Dutch pay) 해도 되나요' 라는 초심자들의 질문이 이어진다. 답변은 다양하다. 철저한 더치 페이파도 있고, 더치 페이를 요구하는 것은 상대방이 맘에 안든다는 뜻이라는 해석, 1차는 남자가 2차는 여자가 내는 게 자연스럽다는 절충 의견도 있다. 대부분의 인간관계(특히 남녀관계)가 그렇듯 논리는 잘 통하지 않는다. "예쁘면 아무리 비싸도 낸다. 못생기면 100원도 아까워." 이런 의견도 다수인 걸 보면.
실은 여자들도 고민이다. 배곯고 사는 시대도 아닌데 맛난 음식 배터지게 먹어보려 소개팅 나가는 여자가 얼마나 되겠나. 내 배로 들어가는 밥, 내 돈 내고 먹는 게 맘 편하다. 하지만 망설여진다. 상대방이 맘에 들 경우에는 더욱 더. 더치 페이를 하겠다고 나섰다가 상대 남자의 자존심을 상하게 하는 건 아닌지, 혹시 '지나치게 독립적인' 여자로 보이는 건 아닌지 싶어서다. 남녀는 동등하다 되뇌이는 자아와, 그럼에도 불구하고 남녀관계는 남자가 주도하는 게 좋다는 통념에 지배받는 자아가 맞선다. 결국 밥값을 능가하는 커피와 디저트를 사면서, 분열된 자아를 주섬주섬 복구한다.
최근 소개팅 상대 여성에게 "너를 만나 40만원이나 썼는데 너는 한 푼도 안 쓰냐"고 욕설을 퍼부으며 폭력을 행사한 30대 남자가 실형을 선고받았다. 씁쓸한 이야기다. 괜히 상대방 자존심 세워주려다 범죄에 연루되지 않으려면, 소개팅 더치 페이 문화 정착에 앞장서는 여자들이 더 많아질 필요가 있다. 아, 국립국어원에 따르면 더치 페이는 '각자내기'라는 우리말로 바꾸는 게 좋다 한다. 시련은 셀프, 밥값은 각자내기다.
이영희 문화스포츠부문 기자

Related Stories

Log in to Twitter or Facebook account to connect
with the Korea JoongAng Daily
help-image Social comment?
s
lock icon

To write comments, please log in to one of the accounts.

Standards Board Policy (0/250자)

What’s Popular Now