Woods heads to Augusta amid doubts about skill

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Woods heads to Augusta amid doubts about skill

AUGUSTA, Ga. - Tiger Woods hit the ball so pure that he felt like a 14-time major champion. Before long, the swing left him and he resembled a guy who couldn’t break 80. He became so frustrated that he even threw a few clubs because of a game that had never been so maddening.

This wasn’t Woods playing in the Masters.

This was the last seven weeks when he was trying to decide if he should even show up.

“I worked my [tail] off,’’ Woods said Tuesday with a smile of satisfaction. “That’s the easiest way to kind of describe it. I worked hard. .?.?. People would never understand how much work I put into it to come and do this again. But it was sunup to sundown, whenever I had free time. If the kids were asleep, I’d still be doing it. And then when they were in school, I’d still be doing it. So it was a lot of work.’’

And he got his answer.

It took nearly two months, followed by two practice rounds at Augusta National last week, before Woods decided to end his self-imposed break and return at the Masters.

Woods last played the Masters two years ago. He was No. 1 in the world and the overwhelming favorite. Now he is at No. 111 in the world and Las Vegas bookies may have been generous in listing him at 40-1.

Golf’s biggest star always lights up Augusta National, and such was the case when he arrived Monday afternoon.

Only now, expectations have been replaced by sheer curiosity. Never mind that he hasn’t played in nearly two months and hasn’t won the Masters in 10 years. When last seen at a tournament, Woods couldn’t hit a simple chip shot, and the rest of his game was barely PGA Tour quality.

But during practice Monday afternoon and Tuesday morning, he looked closer to normal. There appeared to be no issues with his swing or his chipping. He looked comfortable when he hugged his two children on the practice green and in a press room with no empty seats.

Woods always said he didn’t play in a tournament if he didn’t expect to win. That standard hasn’t changed. There are no moral victories, even for a guy who hasn’t won anything since the Bridgestone Invitational in August 2013.

“No, I still feel the same way. I want to win,’’ Woods said. “The whole idea is to prepare and do that. And I feel like my game is finally ready to go and do that again.’’

There was no epiphany on the practice range at home. The goal was to be better at the end of each day. He worked with his new coach, Chris Como, and never lost hope that his game would not return.

He tees off Thursday afternoon. For all the questions about his game, the score will be the measure of his game, just like always.

AP
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