Time for a cool-headed approach (KOR)

Home > 영어학습 > Bilingual News

print dictionary print

Time for a cool-headed approach (KOR)

LEE DONG-HYUN
The author is the deputy editor of industry team at the JoongAng Ilbo. 

 
Several years ago, I completed the basic military training at the Korean Army Training Center in Nonsan, South Chungcheong, and took a TMO train and a M602 truck to get to the ROK Army Intelligence School in Icheon, Gyeonggi. Compared to the tough physical training at Nonsan, the four-week training at the military intelligence school was not very challenging, as it mostly involved reading textbooks, building field experience and conducting written tests.
 
I have many memories of those days, but I cannot discuss in detail as I cannot disclose national secrets as a reservist in Korea. One thing I want to disclose is that I received training to send helium balloons to an aimed location.  
 
We carefully adjusted the amount of helium to the weight of the “articles” in the balloon and to the direction of the wind. But in the practice, they hardly ever flew the way we intended. The instructor openly said that the balloon would not reach the point that trainees intended.
 
As you might have guessed, most of the articles we were sending were propaganda leaflets to North Korea. In some cases, explosives or relief goods could be sent, but it was harder to fly heavier things. South and North Korea stopped sending official propaganda leaflets at the military level after the inter-Korean summit in 2000.  
 
Those who grew up in the 1970s and 80s would have memories of picking up a propaganda leaflet from North Korea and reporting it to the police. The police would give stationery in return for reporting. The “reward” disappeared as the regulation on collecting and disposing North Korean propaganda materials was abolished in 2007. As North Korea’s economic situation worsened, it sent fewer propaganda leaflets than before. As a result, the number of police reports by South Korean children to receive stationery also decreased.
 
The Army Intelligence School produced the first drone specialists last year. I think they no longer offer training on sending balloons on the ground. Public opinion is mixed on civic groups, mostly comprising North Korean defectors, who dispatch propaganda leaflets across the border. Some say that the practice needs to be stopped to help improve inter-Korean relations, while others stress that the freedom of speech should not be restricted for North Korea.
 
Lao Tzu wrote in Tao Te Ching, “When people see some things as beautiful, other things become ugly. When people see some things as good, other things become bad.” Everything in life has two sides. You need to look at both sides and make a calm decision to prevent unwanted consequences.  
 
 
 
삐라
 
이동현 산업1팀 차장
 
여러 해 전 논산 육군 제2훈련소에서 기초군사교육을 마친 뒤 TMO(국군 철도대) 열차와 ‘육공 트럭’을 갈아타고 간 곳은 경기 이천시의 육군정보학교였다. ‘몸을 쓰는’ 논산의 훈련과 비교하면 교재를 읽고 실습하거나 필기시험을 보는 4주간의 정보병 교육이 그리 힘들진 않았다.  
 
여러 기억이 많지만 대한민국 예비역 병장으로서 국가기밀(?)을 누설할 수 없기에 상세히 설명하진 않겠다. 한 가지만 털어놓자면 헬륨가스를 넣은 풍선을 원하는 목표지점까지 보내는 훈련을 받았던 기억이 난다.  
 
전달하려는 ‘물품’의 무게와 풍향에 맞춰 헬륨가스 양을 조절하고 시간과 방향을 정하는데 실습에서 제대로 날아간 적은 거의 없었다. 교관 역시 “제군들이 원하는 곳까지 도달할 일은 없을 것”이라고 공공연히 말할 정도였다.  
 
짐작하다시피 당시 전달하려던 물품은 대부분 대북 전단이었다. 경우에 따라선 폭발물이나 구호품을 날려 보낼 수 있지만 무거운 것은 더 날리기 힘들었다. 남북은 2000년 남북정상회담 이후 군 차원의 공식 전단 살포를 중단했다.  
 
1970~1980년대 어린 시절을 보낸 사람이라면 북한이 날려 보낸 대남 전단을 주워 파출소에 신고한 기억이 있을 것 같다. 신고하면 학용품을 주곤 했는데 2007년 ‘북한 불온선전물 수거처리규칙’이 폐지되면서 사라졌다. 북한 경제 상황이 나빠지면서 대남 전단을 살포하는 양이 줄었고, 어린이들도 학용품을 받기 위해 ‘삐라’를 신고하는 일이 줄어들어서다.  
 
육군정보학교는 지난해 첫 ‘드론 특기병’을 배출했다. 아마도 풍선을 날리는 교육은 더 이상 하지 않을 것 같다. 민간단체가 날려 보내는 대북 전단을 두고 여론이 갈린다. 누군가는 남북 관계 개선을 위해 대북 전단 살포를 막아야 한다고 하고, 누군가는 북한 눈치를 보며 표현의 자유를 막아선 안 된다고 한다.  
 
노자는 『도덕경』에서 “天下皆知美之爲美 斯惡已 皆知善之爲善 斯不善已(천하가 아름답다고 하는 것만을 아름답다 하면 그것은 아름다운 게 아니다. 모두 선하다고 하는 것만 선하다 하면 그것도 선하지 않다)”고 했다. 세상만사는 양면이 있기 마련이다. 양면을 두루 살펴 냉정한 판단을 내려야 뒤탈이 없다.
 

More in Bilingual News

Stop attacks on Yoon (KOR)

Power corrupts (KOR)

Who hampers the investigation? (KOR)

Fearing the jab (KOR)

Passion versus numbers (KOR)

Log in to Twitter or Facebook account to connect
with the Korea JoongAng Daily
help-image Social comment?
lock icon

To write comments, please log in to one of the accounts.

Standards Board Policy (0/250자)

What’s Popular Now