Crackaz proves to be a magnet for health-conscious snackers

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Crackaz proves to be a magnet for health-conscious snackers

If you are a cracker lover, you are in luck. And if you happen to be a cracker lover on a diet, your prayers have been answered: Crackaz, a little shop near the Ewha Womans University subway station, specializes in low-fat crackers and cookies.
The front window of Crackaz is decorated with crackers strung up from ceiling to floor. It is an enticing display. More enticing is the unbelievable selection of hard-to-find (at least in Korea) crackers, cookies and cereal bars. Most of the treats are imported from the United States and Japan.
One of the owners of Crackaz, Lee Dae-wook, says, “Usually, people are worried about eating crackers since they contain lots of fat and sugar. However, low-fat crackers are common products in foreign countries such as the U.S. So, we opened this shop to introduce low-calorie, healthy and delicious snacks to Korea.”
Most of the items are made with either rice or beans. For example, there are crunchy rice cakes and flavorful soy crisps. Sampling one or two of the snacks is no problem, and the ones that I tried were quite tasty (and, according to Mr. Lee, healthy).
The snacks cost from 1,000 won (85 cents) to 5,000 won. Crackaz also sells beverages like cranberry juice, low-fat milk and yogurt.
Though the store has been open for just a month and a half, it already has a loyal clientele. Several of the regular customers say they appreciate the quality, healthy products and reasonable prices.
Mr. Lee, naturally, agrees. He says that their imported snacks only cost a little more than Korean-made ones. Crackaz also plans to start selling homemade muffins and cookies ― low-fat, of course.


CRACKAZ
Location: Leave exit 2 of Ewha Womans University station (line 2) and turn left at a shop called Saera. Crackaz is just up the road on the right.
Hours: 11 a.m. to 9 p.m.
Phone: (02) 363-0881


by Park Yun-ji

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