‘Free Hugs for Peace’ goes online

Home > >

print dictionary print

‘Free Hugs for Peace’ goes online

테스트

One of the things I don’t get is the free hug. The boom has passed, but we used to frequently see people holding a sign offering free hugs in downtown Seoul. While it began as a movement to heal loneliness and share a common bond through hugs, I doubted whether a sense of fellowship could arise so easily.

But when a Japanese friend shared a link on Facebook last week, I was touched. It was a video titled “I am a Japanese guy and I took the free hugs campaign in Korea.” Koichi Kuwabara offered free hugs in 2011 and 2013. In the video, the young man is holding up a picture of Korean and Japanese flags and a sign: “Free Hugs for Peace,” and goes around busy streets of Seoul. “People say we don’t like each other because of the history between us. But I knew we’re calling for peace.”

At first, people passed by indifferently, but soon, a young man approaches and has an awkward hug. Then a young girl runs up and hugs him. A student dashes toward him and gives him a big hug as if they are old friends. Kuwabara hugs Samulnori performers preparing at a stage at Gwanghwamun Square and also a police officer. An old man taps his shoulders and appreciates his courage.

The video is garnering attention again as the Korea-Japan relationship worsens. In a joint survey conducted by newspapers in Korea and Japan, 73 percent of Japanese respondents and 83 percent of Koreans said that they don’t trust the other country. The percentage of Japanese who said they trust Korea is at its lowest since the survey was first conducted in 1995. Koreans’ trust of Japan is the lowest in seven years. It is hard for me to trust someone who doesn’t already trust me. The bilateral relations seem to have been trapped in this same vicious cycle of distrust.

But there is hope in the fact that 90 percent of Koreans and 83 percent of the Japanese recognize the need to improve the relations. As the political discord isn’t showing signs of a resolution, the young man’s attempt at understanding each other through hugs is meaningful. Earlier this year, he visited Korea for his third free hug campaign, and the latest video will be released on YouTube soon. A hug with a stranger may not immediately create a strong bond, but every little belief we share as we put our arms around each other can become a meaningful beginning for trust that will bolster the Korea-Japan relationship whenever it is shaken by controversial issues.

JoongAng Ilbo, June 10, Page 35

*The author is a culture and sports news writer of the JoongAng Ilbo.

BY LEE YOUNG-HEE


















볼 때마다 ‘저건 대체 왜 하지’ 생각한 것 중 하나가 프리 허그(Free Hugs)다. 요즘은 유행이 지났지만, 한 때 명동이나 홍대 번화가를 지나면 '안아드립니다' 같은 피켓을 든 사람들과 종종 마주쳤다. 포옹으로 파편화된 현대인의 고독을 치유하고 유대감을 나누자는 취지로 시작된 운동이라지만, 유대감이란게 그리 쉽게 생겨날리가, 싶었다.
지난 주말, 한 일본인 친구가 페이스북에 올린 동영상을 보다 울컥했다. ‘일본인이 한국에서 프리 허그를 해 보았습니다’라는 제목을 단 이 동영상은 구와바라 고이치(桑原功一)라는 한 일본인 청년이 2011년과 2013년 두 차례에 걸쳐 유튜브에 올린 영상이다. 한국과 일본 국기 그림에 ‘프리 허그 포 피스(Free-Hugs for Peace)'라고 적힌 종이를 든 청년이 서울 시내를 걸어간다. 그 위로 ’사람들은 우리가 서로 미워한다고 말한다. 하지만 나는 우리가 평화를 원한다고 믿는다‘는 자막이 흐른다.
처음에는 무관심하게 지나쳐 가는 사람들, 곧 한 청년이 다가와 어색하게 포옹을 나눈다. 엄마 손을 잡고 나온 꼬마가 뛰어와 안기고, 한 남학생은 반가운 옛 친구를 만난 듯 멀리서 달려와 매달린다. 광화문 광장에서는 공연을 준비하는 사물놀이패, 경찰과도 껴안는다. 청년의 어깨를 툭툭 두드리며 격려하는 어르신도 있다.
최근 이 동영상이 일본에서 다시 주목받는 건 악화일로의 한일관계 때문일 것이다. 지난 주 양국 언론사가 함께 실시한 여론조사에서는 일본인의 73%가 한국을, 한국인의 83%가 일본을 믿을 수 없는 나라라고 답했다. 한국을 신뢰하는 일본인의 비율은 1995년 조사 시작 이후 최저, 한국인의 일본에 대한 신뢰감도 최근 7년 사이 가장 낮은 수준이다. 나를 믿지 못한다는 이를 신뢰하기란 어려운 법. 그렇게 양국관계는 불신이 불신을 증폭시키는 악순환에 접어든 모양새다.
희망적인 건 한국인의 90%, 일본인 83%가 양국 관계를 개선해야 한다고 생각한다는 점이다. 해법이 보이지 않는 정치적 갈등 속에서 개인이 몸으로 부딪혀 서로를 이해해보자 나선 한 청년의 시도는 그래서 의미 있어 보인다. 그는 올해 초 한국을 다시 찾아 촬영한 세 번째 프리 허그 동영상을 조만간 유튜브에 공개한다. 낯선 이와의 포옹 한번에 끈끈한 유대감이 생기진 않겠지만, 서로의 몸에 팔을 두르며 생긴 작은 믿음은 이슈마다 출렁이는 양국 관계를 단단하게 받치는 더 큰 신뢰의 출발이 될 수 있으므로.
이영희 문화스포츠부문 기자
Log in to Twitter or Facebook account to connect
with the Korea JoongAng Daily
help-image Social comment?
s
lock icon

To write comments, please log in to one of the accounts.

Standards Board Policy (0/250자)

What’s Popular Now