Keeping global talent (KOR)

Home > 영어학습 > Bilingual News

print dictionary print

Keeping global talent (KOR)

CHOI JI-YOUNG
The author is head of the industry news team 2 of the JoongAng Ilbo.

Tim Baxter, president and CEO of Samsung Electronics North America, is leaving the company in June after 13 years. He is a symbolic figure at Samsung, having been the first foreigner named vice president (2011) and the first with the title of president (2017) in the group. Marc Mathieu, chief marketing officer at Samsung North America, number three at the subsidiary, left after four years.

Senior Vice President John Absmeier moved to Lear Corporation, a U.S. auto parts company and Samsung rival in the device business. He worked for three years at Samsung Electronics, leading the company’s self-driving technology efforts.

It is unclear whether the global talent leaves because of the company’s internal situation, personal circumstances or a domino effect. Global talent moves to companies that offer more, and Samsung recruit others.

LG Electronics attempted to appoint foreigners to key positions when Nam Yong was vice chairman, but the plan was canceled due to internal criticism. There are currently no foreigners at the executive director level.

Let’s resort to big data. I looked up Glassdoor, the company review website. It is a site that Americans refer to the most when changing jobs. Current and former employees can only review their companies by submitting business emails. Samsung Electronics is rated 3.5 stars out of 5, and 65 percent would recommend it to friends. It is a great improvement from 2.8 stars in 2014. LG Electronics possesses lower scores: 3.2 stars and a 48 percent recommendation score. Hyundai Motor is similarly ranked: 3.4 stars and a 48 percent recommendation score.

Apple, which competes in the same talent pool, has 4.0 stars and a 78 percent recommendation score, while Amazon possesses 3.8 stars and a 74 percent recommendation score. GM and Toyota, Hyundai competitors, earned higher marks, with 3.6 stars and a 67 percent recommendation score, and 3.6 stars and a 70 percent recommendation score, respectively.

Foreigners who are current and former employees of Samsung, LG, Hyundai and other Korean companies gave lowest scores on senior management. Criticisms include top-down culture, asking to repeat the same task, proposing ideas that are not maintained and a backward corporate culture.

JoongAng Ilbo, March 20, Page 29

글로벌 인재에 한국 기업은 매력적일까
팀 백스터 삼성전자 북미법인 대표(사장)가 13년간의 삼성전자 생활을 마감하고 오는 6월 회사를 떠난다. 그는 2011년 외국인 최초 부사장, 2017년 외국인 최초 사장으로 승진한 삼성전자의 외국인 인재 상징 같은 인물이다. 북미법인 ‘서열 3위’ 마크 매튜 삼성전자 북미법인 최고마케팅책임자(CMOㆍ전무)도 약 4년간의 삼성전자 생활을 마치고 그만뒀다.
존 앱스마이어 삼성전자 SVP(Senior Vice Presidentㆍ전무급)도 지난해 삼성전자의 전장(전기장치) 사업 경쟁자인 미국 자동차 부품회사 리어로 자리를 옮긴 사실이 뒤늦게 알려졌다. 그는 자율주행 기술과 첨단운전자보조시스템(ADAS) 개발을 주도했던 인물로, 3년간 삼성전자에 근무했다.
글로벌 인재들이 잇따라 그만두는 것이 회사 내부의 사정 때문인지, 임원 개별 사정인지, 아니면 그냥 도미노 효과인지는 분명치 않다. 글로벌 인재는 끊임없이 더 좋은 조건을 제시하는 곳으로 옮기고, 삼성전자 또한 다른 글로벌 인재를 영입하는 작업을 계속하는 것도 사실이다.
또 다른 글로벌 기업 LG전자는 남용 전 부회장 때 요직에 외국인 인재를 앉히는 시도를 했다. 하지만 내부 비판 끝에 접었다. 현재 전무급 이상에선 외국인 임원이 한명도 없다.
이쯤 해서 빅데이터의 힘을 빌려보자. 미국 직장평가 사이트 ‘글래스도어’를 찾아봤다. 미국인이 이직할 때 가장 많이 참고한다는 곳이다. 전ㆍ현직 직원들이 해당 기업을 평가할 때 회사 e메일을 넣지 않으면 평가를 올릴 수 없는 곳이다. 삼성전자는 별 5개 만점에 3.5점을 받았다. 65%만이 친구에게 추천하겠다고 했다. 그나마 2.8점에 그쳤던 2014년보단 훨씬 좋아졌다. LG전자 점수는 더 낮다. 3.2점에 48%만이 친구에게 추천이다. 현대차도 비슷한 처지다. 3.4점에 48%만이 친구에게 추천하겠다는 평가다.
이에 비해 인재 시장의 경쟁자인 애플은 4.0점에 78% 추천, 아마존은 3.8점에 74% 추천을 받고 있다. 현대차와 경쟁하는 GM(3.6점, 67% 추천)이나 도요타(3.6점, 70% 추천)도 현대차보다 평가가 높다.
외국인 전ㆍ현직 직원들이 삼성ㆍLGㆍ현대차 등 국내 기업에 대해 가장 짠 점수를 준 항목은 ‘시니어 매니지먼트’다. “상명하복 문화, 했던 일을 또 하라고 한다, 아이디어를 내도 관리가 안 된다, 기업 문화가 후지다”는 등의 혹평이 쏟아졌다. 뭘 고쳐야 글로벌 인재에게 매력적인 기업이 될지, 답은 명확한데 실천이 어려워 고민스럽겠다.

More in Bilingual News

A warning to Moon (KOR)

No marriage, no child (KOR)

Stop the crusade (KOR)

Will investigations continue? (KOR)

Choo must resign (KOR)

Log in to Twitter or Facebook account to connect
with the Korea JoongAng Daily
help-image Social comment?
lock icon

To write comments, please log in to one of the accounts.

Standards Board Policy (0/250자)

What’s Popular Now