2020.6.1 New Arrivals

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2020.6.1 New Arrivals

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Limitless Mind: Learn, Lead and Live Without Barriers  
AUTHOR : Jo Boaler
PUBLISHER : Thorsons


When we learn, we change what we believe and how we interact with the world. This changes who we are as people and what we can achieve.
 
Many people grow up being told they are "not a maths person" or perhaps "not smart." They come to believe their potential is limited.
 
Now, however, the latest science has revealed that our identities are constantly in flux; when we learn new things, we can change our identities, increase our potential and broaden our capacity to receive new information.
 
Drawing from the latest research, Professor Boaler followed thousands of school students, studied their learning practices and examined the most effective ways to transform pupils from low to high achievers. Throughout her study, Boaler has collaborated with Stanford University neuroscience experts, harnessing their expertise to reinforce her advanced understanding of learning and educational development.
 
In Limitless Mind, Boaler presents original groundbreaking research that proves that limiting beliefs really do hold us back from fulfilling our potential and that with a few careful life hacks we can transform our potential for good.  
 
The Coddling of the American Mind: How Good Intentions and Bad Ideas Are Setting Up a Generation for Failure  
AUTHOR : Jonathan Haidt, Greg Lukianoff  
PUBLISHER : Penguin 
 
Have good intentions, over-parenting and the decline in unsupervised play led to the emergence of modern identity politics and hypersensitivity?

 
In this book, free speech campaigner Greg Lukianoff and social psychologist Jonathan Haidt investigate a new cultural phenomenon of "safetyism", beginning on American college campuses in 2014 and spreading throughout academic institutions in the English-speaking world.
 
Looking at the consequences of paranoid parenting, the increase in anxiety and depression amongst students and the rise of new ideas about justice, Lukianoff and Haidt argue that well-intended but misguided attempts to protect young people are damaging their development and mental health, the functioning of educational systems and even democracy itself.  
 
 
On Immunity: An Inoculation  
AUTHOR : Eula Biss
PUBLISHER : Graywolf Press  
 
Why do we fear vaccines? A provocative examination by Eula Biss, the author of Notes from No Man's Land, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award.
 
Upon becoming a new mother, Eula Biss addresses a chronic condition of fear of the government, the medical establishment and what is in your child's air, food, mattress, medicine and vaccines. She finds that you cannot immunize your child, or yourself, from the world.
 
In this bold, fascinating book, Biss investigates the metaphors and myths surrounding our conception of immunity and its implications for the individual and the social body. As she hears more and more fears about vaccines, Biss researches what they mean for her own child, her immediate community, America and the world, both historically and in the present moment. She extends a conversation with other mothers to meditations on Voltaire's "Candide," Bram Stoker's "Dracula," Rachel Carson's "Silent Spring," Susan Sontag's "AIDS and Its Metaphors" and beyond. 
 
On Immunity is a moving account of how we are all interconnected — our bodies and our fates.
 
 
Midnight in Chernobyl: The Untold Story of the World's Greatest Nuclear Disaster
AUTHOR : Adam Higginbotham
PUBLISHER : Simon & Schuster  


From journalist Adam Higginbotham, the New York Times bestselling “account that reads almost like the script for a movie” (The Wall Street Journal) — a powerful investigation into Chernobyl and how propaganda, secrecy and myth have obscured the true story of one of the history’s worst nuclear disasters.
 
Early in the morning of April 26, 1986, Reactor Number Four of the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant exploded, triggering one of the twentieth century’s greatest disasters. 
 
In the thirty years since then, Chernobyl has become lodged in the collective nightmares of the world: shorthand for the spectral horrors of radiation poisoning, for a dangerous technology slipping its leash, for ecological fragility and for what can happen when a dishonest and careless state endangers its citizens and the entire world. But the real story of the accident, clouded from the beginning by secrecy, propaganda and misinformation, has long remained in dispute.
 
Drawing on hundreds of hours of interviews conducted over the course of more than ten years, as well as letters, unpublished memoirs and documents from recently-declassified archives, Adam Higginbotham brings the disaster to life through the eyes of the men and women who witnessed it firsthand. The result is a “riveting, deeply reported reconstruction” (Los Angeles Times) and a definitive account of an event that changed history: a story that is more complex, more human, and more terrifying than the Soviet myth.
 
“The most complete and compelling history yet” (The Christian Science Monitor), Higginbotham’s “superb, enthralling, and necessarily terrifying...extraordinary” (The New York Times) book is an indelible portrait of the lessons learned when mankind seeks to bend the natural world to his will — lessons which, in the face of climate change and other threats, remain not just vital but necessary.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
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