When Chicago met Seoul, a music story

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When Chicago met Seoul, a music story

Chicago can fill a concert with nothing but its hits. The brass-heavy pop-rock band has been been performing for more than 35 years. During that time, it has recorded such classics as "You're the Inspiration," "Look Away" and "Hard to Say I'm Sorry."

Chicago will play Jamsil Stadium at 8 p.m. Tuesday as part of its Asian tour.

Founded in 1967, as the Chicago Transit Authority, the band's horn-fueled jazz-rock sound immediately found a following. The debut album, named after the band, went double platinum and spawned several hit singles, including "I'm a Man," "Does Anybody Know What Time It Is?" and "Beginnings." The line-up was Peter Cetera on vocals and bass, Terry Kath on guitar and vocals, Robert Lamm on organ and vocals, Danny Seraphine on drums, Walter Parazaider on saxophone, James Pankow on trombone and Lee Loughnane on trumpet.

When Chicago's municipal transportation company, the Chicago Transit Authority, threatened to sue over the rights to its name, the band became Chicago. That was the CTA's loss. Chicago became one of the most commercially successful bands to come from United States. Each of the 11 albums that followed its debut reached the top 10 on the music charts.

Even with the death of Kath, the departure of Cetera and a parting of the ways with the band's long-time manager and producer James William Guercio, Chicago has continued to rack up the hits. In recent years, its studio production has slowed, but it is still a big concert attraction.

The band now consists of long-time members Loughnane and Parazaider, Robert Lamm on vocals, keyboards and percussion, James Pankow on trombone, percussion and vocals, Bill Champlin on vocals, keyboards and guitar, Jason Scheff on vocals and bass, Tris Imboden on drums and harmonica, and Keith Howland on guitar.


by Joe Yong-hee

For more information, call (02) 515-7941.

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