Korean Air decides now would be a good time to up prices

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Korean Air decides now would be a good time to up prices

Korean Air Lines and Asiana Airlines aircraft parked at Incheon International Airport on Dec. 1. [NEWS1]

Korean Air Lines and Asiana Airlines aircraft parked at Incheon International Airport on Dec. 1. [NEWS1]

 
In the midst of a controversial takeover and with a collapse in air travel globally, Korean Air Lines has decided it would be a good time to raise prices on some of its seats.  

 
Next month, the carrier will charge more for some of its more comfortable seats in economy.
 
Korean Air Lines has three classes of seating: first, prestige and economy. The airline says that the new, more expensive seating does not constitute the creation of a premium economy. It is just charging more for regular economy seats that offer more space due to their location or positioning.
 
“As of Jan. 7, 2021, Korean Air is adding new categories for advanced seat selection which can be purchased during the booking process,” the airline announced.
 
The new seating price applies to passengers who purchase economy class tickets for international flights. The effective date is Jan. 7, but it will first apply to flights departing on Jan. 14.
 
More expensive seats include those near emergency exits, which offer more legroom, front-row seats and “any other seats that make a passenger's journey easier and more flexible.”
 
Customers are not required to pay an additional fee for seats that were assigned before the new pricing goes effective. But the new rules will apply if changes occur.
 
Pricing will differ depending on the origin and destination.
 
An economy seat with extra legroom taking off from Korea bound for the United States will cost an extra 150,000 won ($138).  
 
Passengers with reduced mobility, such as those who are pregnant or with disabilities, are able to reserve dedicated seats free of charge.
 
Korean Air Lines has been the subject of complaints in the past for policies related to refunds and air miles. As it seeks to acquire Asiana Airlines and is set to achieve clear market dominance, the airline has promised not to use its power to raise prices.   
 
BY JIN MIN-JI   [jin.minji@joongang.co.kr]
 
 

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